Our Board

M. Michelle Day 
Founder and CEO
Restorative Justice Practitioner


Ms. Day is a minister, attorney and certified mediator, with more than 25 years of experience in conflict transformation, dedicated to the healing of community. She is employed as Program Administrator for the Juvenile Justice and Child Protection Department of the Circuit Court of Cook County, developing restorative justice collaborations between court, community, public and private agencies, to meet the needs of court involved children and families. Ms. Day also serves as a member of the Chicago’s citywide Community Restorative Justice HUBS leadership circle. Ms. Day facilitates courses in Restorative Leadership, Conflict Transformation, and Christian Conflict Transformation throughout the city and nationally, assisting businesses, churches and other organizations in transforming difficult situations through development of conflict transformation skills and processes. She leads the Radical Peacemaking Team of the Justice and Witness Ministry of the Chicago Metropolitan Association, Illinois Conference of the United Church of Christ and is a former two-term Board member of the Community Renewal Society. She has taught courses at universities including violence as a public health issue at the School of Public Health at University of Illinois, Chicago. She is a graduate of McCormick Theological Seminary (M.Div.), DePaul College of Law and Indiana University.

Daryle E. Brown 
Treasurer
Restorative Justice Practitioner

 

Mr. Brown is a trained and experienced restorative practices practitioner who has facilitated numerous peace circles (including talking, healing, strategic planning and conflict) in various settings. He is a skilled facilitator who has conducted interactive workshops in corporate America, churches and other not-for profits for many years. He has spent over 30 years in various product development and marketing roles, for corporations like Ameritech, US Robotics, 3Com and Abbott International. Concurrent with his corporate work he has a long history of volunteer/community leadership as a member of Optimist International, founder of Africare-Detroit and service on various non-profit boards. He has been active in Prison Ministry for over 17 years. In December of 2010 he worked to bring Professor Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, to lecture and participate in a panel discussion. Soon after that event he formed The Next Movement, an Interfaith committee, to begin to "evangelize, organize and strategize" around the issue of ending mass incarceration in America. Mr. Brown is a graduate of the Michigan State University College of Business.

Olivia Chase 
Secretary
Restorative Justice Practitioner

 

Ms. Chase is trained and experienced in the facilitation of Restorative Justice Circles, Conferencing and workshops in temporary detention and prison settings, grade and secondary schools, faith-based and community-based organizations.  She has an experiential base in adult outpatient treatment, child welfare, adoptions, public policy advocacy, and 501(c)(3) agency advancement with tenures at The Garfield Park Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center, (renamed The Bobby E. Wright Comprehensive Behavioral Health Center after its founder), Lutheran Child and Family Services, Lutheran Family Mission and The Chicago Jobs Council.  After nearly twenty-five years in the human service sector, Ms. Chase spent nearly twenty years as one of the principals and COO of a vegan foodservice entity.  When she returned to social service, it was as the Family Service Specialist for the Connections program of Lutheran Social Services of Illinois, serving incarcerated women, returning citizens and their families within a holistic model built on restorative justice principles and practices, a position she retired from in the fall of 2015.  She holds a Master’s Degree in Counseling Psychology, George Williams College, and a BS in Education, Concordia.

Edith Crigler 
Board Member
Restorative Justice Practitioner
 

Ms. Crigler has an impressive forty-year experiential base in the human service field.  She is a nationally certified Balance and Restorative Justice trainer who has taught Restorative Justice in the Criminal Justice department at Chicago State University.  She has also served as a social work field instructor at the University of Chicago, School of Social Work Administration and Chicago State University, School of Social Work.  She has designed and conducted workshops for human service and law enforcement professionals focused on the myriad of issues germane to poverty.  Ms. Crigler was the first and only Director of the African-American Caucus for the Family Resource Coalition of America (FRCA) where she coordinated, supervised and directed all projects focused on African-American family issues to include publications, policy analyses, counseling and training.  In October of 2011, Governor Quinn appointed Ms. Crigler to a six-year term on the Illinois Prisoner Review Board, where she serves as a board member.  Ms. Crigler holds a BA in Political Science, a Paralegal Certificate from Roosevelt University and an MA degree in Administration and Social Policy from the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration.

Karen Fulbright-Anderson 
Board Member

 

 

Mrs. Fulbright-Anderson has experience in the philanthropic and non-profit sectors designing, implementing, advising, and monitoring knowledge and information sharing, program assessment, capacity building and identifying emerging solutions to address the challenges faced by low income people and communities of color. Her skill set includes leadership development, primary and secondary research, strategic planning, program design and management, the application of the theory of change approach to planning and evaluation, policy analysis, multi-disciplinary literature analyses, field scans, non-profit capacity building, and curriculum development. Her substantive areas of experience include community change, racial equity, youth development, and economic development. Karen has worked at the Aspen Institute for seventeen years in a variety of capacities including Research Fellow, Policy Program Director and Senior Fellow at the Roundtable on Community Change, and as the Chair of Policy Programs for the Aspen Institute. Prior to joining the Aspen Institute, Karen was the director of research for the Vera Institute of Justice. She worked as a program officer at the Ford Foundation and a senior program officer at the Commonwealth Fund where she developed funding strategies to improve outcomes for young people in high poverty communities. She worked in academia as faculty member at The New School for Social Research and a visiting professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has a Ph.D. in Urban Studies and Planning and a Master of City Planning degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a B.A. from Wellesley College.

Vanessa Westley 
Board Member
Restorative Justice Practitioner

 

Officer Vanessa Westley is a twenty-five year veteran of the Chicago Police Department.  She has served in various positions within the Department’s Patrol Division and other units.  She began her service in Community Policing in 2004 under now-retired First Deputy Dana V. Starks, as project manager in the Department’s CAPS Project Office.  She later served as project manager for the Mayor’s Office of Faith Based and Community Partnerships.  Currently she is the program manager for the Chicago Police Department’s and the Metro YMCA’s “Bridging the Divide” program.  She is the special projects coordinator for the CAPS Revitalization effort launched in 2013.  She leads the community engagement training program for the Department through DePaul University’s Center for Urban Education.  Vanessa is a Restorative Justice and Art of Hosting practitioner and trainer.

Rev. Jesse Knox 
Board Member
Restorative Justice Practitioner
 

Rev. Jesse Knox, III has served as Senior Minister of Church of The Good Shepherd UCC since 2011, although his service with the Church extends from 1992, where he was appointed Executive Director of Good Shepherd Community Services Organization in 1994. Previous professional experience includes serving as, Acting Director of Ministry Studies for the University of Chicago Divinity School, Director of the Minority Outreach Project of Thresholds National Research and Training Center, and chaplain at Unity Funeral Parlors.  He is currently a Leadership Greater Chicago Fellow since 2001.

 

Present volunteer service includes the Chicago Metropolitan Association of the United Church of Christ (UCC)’s Congregational Life Committee, the Property Management Committee of the Illinois Conference of the UCC, boards of the Washington Park Consortium, Embrace Living Communities, South East Chicago Commission, Community Renewal Society, Leadership Greater Chicago Fellows Association and Woodlawn, Washington Park, South Shore. Rev. Knox was previously a member of the board of the Christian Century. He also served on the Personnel Committee of the Illinois Conference of the UCC. In addition to his Bachelor and Master degrees in Religious Studies and Ministry, Rev. Knox has certification in Veterans Support Project Asset-Based Community Development, Veteran Peer Specialist and Veteran Spiritual Care Integration, as well as housing and community and economic development. He has written and lectured on a range of topics related to church-based communities and the contemporary situation of urban churches.